Vaccinate Your Baby

Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Click on the photo above to open the Vaccine-Preventable Diseases eBook!

Designed to be online and interactive, Every Child By Two's Vaccine-Preventable Diseases eBook includes important information on vaccine-preventable diseases and the vaccines used to prevent them. Each disease page also contains an interesting fact and graphic about the disease. The eBook may also be downloaded, printed and distributed - either as whole or as individual disease pages. To view and download the individual disease pages, please click on the links to each disease below. We hope that you find it to be a useful tool and share it with other parents and caregivers looking for information on vaccine-preventable diseases.

Diphtheria

Diphtheria is a serious and very contagious bacterial disease. Complications from diphtheria may include  blocked airway; damage to the heart muscle; nerve damage; paralysis; lung infection; and even death. Without treatment, 40-50% of infected persons die, with the highest death rates occurring in children under 5 and adults over 40 years old.
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Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

Haemophilus Influenzae type b (Hib) is a serious bacterial infection that can cause acute bacterial meningitis, pneumonia, seizures, permanent deafness and mental retardation. Even with treatment, as many as 1 out of 20 children with Hib meningitis die. As many as 1 out of 5 children who survive Hib meningitis will have brain damage or become deaf.
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Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis A virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months.
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Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B, caused by infection with the hepatitis B virus, is a contagious liver disease that ranges in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. Many parents mistakenly believe that hepatitis B is strictly a sexually-transmitted disease and are reluctant to have their child vaccinated at the recommended ages. In fact, an individual who is unaware that they have hepatitis B can easily pass on the disease to an unvaccinated child when giving birth (spread from infected mother to baby) or through actions as simple as the sharing of a toothbrush.
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Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer in women. Each year in the U.S., HPV causes approximately 15,000 cancers in women and about 7,000 cancers in men. Cervical cancer causes about 4,000 deaths in women each year in the U.S. HPV is so common that almost everyone will be infected with HPV at some point in their lives.
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Influenza

Influenza (flu) is a serious disease. It is a highly contagious viral infection of the respiratory tract (nose, throat, and lungs). The flu can result in serious health problems, hospitalizations, and even death. Each year in the U.S., more than 20,000 children under the age of 5 are hospitalized and approximately 100 children under the age of 5 dies as a result of the flu.
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Measles

Measles is a highly contagious disease. According to the CDC, there are currently a record number of measles cases in the U.S. Since the beginning of 2014, almost 600 cases of measles have been reported and the numbers continue to rise. The majority of measles cases reported this year have been in people who were unvaccinated or who had an unknown vaccination status, and almost all measles cases were associated with importations of the disease from other countries.
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Meningococcal disease

The most common form of meningococcal disease is meningitis. Meningococcal meningitis can be fatal and deaths can occur in as little as a few hours. Meningococcal bacteria can also cause a serious and potentially fatal blood infection called sepsis. As with meningitis, deaths from sepsis can occur in as little as a few hours. Each year in the U.S., approximately 800-1,200 people get meningococcal disease.
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Mumps

Mumps is a contagious disease that is caused by the mumps virus. About half of the people who get mumps have very mild or no symptoms, and don't know they are infected.People with mumps usually recover after a week or two, but mumps can occasionally cause serious complications. Prior to the mumps vaccine, approximately 200,000 cases of mumps and 20 to 30 deaths occurred each year in the U.S.
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Pertussis

Also known as whooping cough, pertussis is a highly contagious disease. It is also the most common vaccine-preventable disease in the U.S. Pertussis can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening complications in infants and young children, especially those who are not fully vaccinated. Many infants who get pertussis catch it from their parents or older brothers and sisters – who might not even know they have the disease. Ninety-percent (90%) of pertussis-associated deaths have been among babies less than 1 year old. In infants younger than 1 year of age who get pertussis, about half are hospitalized.
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Pneumococcal

Pneumococcal disease is an infection caused by bacteria called pneumococcus. It is the most common cause of pneumonia, inflammation of the coverings of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis), bloodstream infection (sepsis), ear infections and sinus infections (sinusitis) in children under 2 years of age.Each year in the U.S., pneumococcal disease causes thousands of cases of pneumonia and ear infections. In addition, about 4,000 cases of serious pneumococcal disease (meningitis and blood stream infection) occur in children under 5 years old in the U.S. About 1 out of 10 children who get pneumococcal meningitis dies.
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Polio

Polio is a potentially deadly and crippling infectious disease caused by the poliovirus. Polio was one of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century with annual epidemics, primarily during the summer months. Before the polio vaccines were available, polio outbreaks caused more than 15,000 cases of paralysis each year in the U.S.
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Rotavirus

Rotavirus is a contagious disease caused by any one of three strains of rotavirus. Children who get infected may have severe diarrhea, often with vomiting, fever, and stomach pain. They can become severely dehydrated (loss of body fluids) and need to be hospitalized and can even die. Rotavirus is still the leading cause of severe diarrhea in infants and children worldwide. In 2008, rotavirus caused an estimated 453,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years of age.
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Rubella

Rubella, also known as German measles, is a contagious disease caused by a virus. Rubella is most dangerous for pregnant women and their babies. If a pregnant women is infected with the disease it can cause miscarriage, stillbirth, premature birth, or birth defects such as heart problems, hearing and vision loss, intellectual disabilities (also known as mental retardation), and liver or spleen damage.
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Tetanus

Commonly known as lockjaw, tetanus is a severe disease that causes stiffness and spasms of the muscles, with up to 20 percent of reported cases ending in death. Unlike other vaccine-preventable diseases, which are transferred from person to person, tetanus bacteria are found in places such as dirt/soil, dust and manure. Almost all cases of tetanus occur in people who have never received a tetanus vaccine, or adults who don't stay up to date on their tetanus booster shots.
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Varicella/Chickenpox

Varicella, commonly known as chickenpox, is a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It causes a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever. Although people usually think of chickenpox as a mild disease and a "rite of passage" for all children, the disease can be very serious and even deadly. Before the chickenpox vaccine, approximately 4 million people in the U.S. got sick with the disease each year.
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